top of page
Search

Unlocking Debt's Time Vault: State-by-State of limitations Revealed


Debt collection is a complex process, and understanding the statute of limitations is crucial for both creditors and debtors. Each State in the United States has its own laws regarding the time limit within which a creditor can legally pursue debt collection. These statutes of limitations protect consumers from excessive and unfair debt collection practices. In this article, we provide a comprehensive State-by-State list of the statute of limitations on debt collection, shedding light on the rights and obligations of both parties involved.


It is important to note that the statutes of limitations mentioned above are subject to change and may vary depending on the specific circumstances of each case. It is always advisable to consult with a legal professional or debt relief expert to understand the applicable statute of limitations in your state and its implications on debt collection efforts.


Explanation of Debt Types:


Open Accounts: These include debts arising from ongoing credit arrangements, such as credit cards or lines of credit. They usually have shorter statute of limitations periods.





Promissory Notes: This category encompasses debts backed by a written promise to repay a specific amount at a defined time or in installments.





Written Contracts: These debts are established through written agreements, such as loans or purchase contracts.








Oral Contracts: These debts result from spoken agreements without written documentation. The statute of limitations for oral contracts can vary.





Understanding the statute of limitations on debt collection by state is essential for creditors and debtors alike. These laws provide a framework that balances the rights of creditors to collect legitimate debts with the need to protect consumers from unfair practices. By being aware of the statute of limitations in your state, you can make informed decisions and take appropriate action regarding debt collection.


Remember to seek professional advice when dealing with debt collection to ensure you understand your rights and obligations within the confines of the statute of limitations.

The following chart presents the statute of limitations for debt collection in all 50 States:


State

Open Accounts

Written Contracts

Promissory Notes

Oral Contracts

Alabama

3 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Alaska

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

Arizona

3 years

6 years

6 years

3 years

Arkansas

3 years

5 years

5 years

3 years

California

4 years

4 years

4 years

2 years

Colorado

3 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Connecticut

3 years

6 years

6 years

3 years

Delaware

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

Florida

4 years

5 years

5 years

4 years

Georgia

6 years

6 years

6 years

4 years

Hawaii

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Idaho

4 years

5 years

5 years

4 years

Illinois

5 years

10 years

10 years

5 years

Indiana

6 years

10 years

10 years

6 years

Iowa

5 years

10 years

10 years

5 years

Kansas

3 years

5 years

5 years

3 years

Kentucky

5 years

15 years

15 years

5 years

Louisiana

3 years

10 years

10 years

3 years

Maine

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Maryland

3 years

3 years

6 years

3 years

Massachusetts

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Michigan

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Minnesota

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Mississippi

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

Missouri

5 years

10 years

10 years

5 years

Montana

5 years

8 years

8 years

5 years

Nebraska

4 years

5 years

6 years

4 years

Nevada

4 years

6 years

6 years

4 years

New Hampshire

3 years

3 years

6 years

3 years

New Jersey

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

New Mexico

4 years

6 years

6 years

4 years

New York

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

North Carolina

3 years

3 years

5 years

3 years

North Dakota

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Ohio

6 years

8 years

15 years

6 years

Oklahoma

3 years

5 years

5 years

3 years

Oregon

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Pennsylvania

4 years

4 years

4 years

4 years

Rhode Island

10 years

10 years

10 years

10 years

South Carolina

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

South Dakota

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Tennessee

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Texas

4 years

4 years

4 years

4 years

Utah

4 years

6 years

6 years

4 years

Vermont

6 years

6 years

6 years

6 years

Virginia

3 years

5 years

6 years

3 years

Washington

3 years

6 years

6 years

3 years

West Virginia

5 years

10 years

10 years

5 years

Wisconsin

6 years

6 years

10 years

6 years

Wyoming

8 years

10 years

10 years

8 years




44 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

DIY Credit Repair: Is it Worth the Risk?

If you've been struggling with a low credit score, you may be wondering whether it's possible to repair your credit on your own. DIY credit repair is a popular option for those looking to improve thei

Comments


bottom of page